Sewing the Bralette in the Tropo Camisole

The optional built-in bralette in the Tropo Camisole does make it a bit harder to sew the camisole, but I think it’s totally worth it. Personally, I wear my Tropos all the time and only wear them with bralettes because I don’t need a lot of bust support and I love the fact that I don’t have to worry about bra straps showing under the camisole. If you’d like to sew a bralette into your Tropo Camisole but want a little extra hand-holding, read on! You can sew the bralette out of a variety of fabrics. (See the Tropo Camisole Fabric post and the Tropo Camisole Bralette Fabric post for more info). This example is using a sport lycra. Depending on your bust size and shape, desired level of support, and the fabric you are using, you may wish to change the shape of the bralette. I shaved off about …

How to Sew the Straps on the Tropo Camisole

Sometimes it’s nice to have some extra hand-holding through a tricky sewing step, isn’t it? This blog post will walk you through how to to sew all of the versions of the straps on the Tropo Camisole with an emphasis on the V-strap version since it can be a little intimidating. My favorite version is the V-strap on both front and back since it’s super fun and a little bit sexy and, hopefully, if you were worried about it being too hard, this post will convince you that you can do it!. (And if it’s not you’re thing, that’s cool too. Read along for the other strap configurations too!). If you’re using a bralette, make sure that it’s done and basted to the camisole all along the top – neckline and underarm both. Finish the neckline of both the front and back of the Tropo Camisole with fold-over elastic. (Read all about …

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Tropo Camisole Bralette Fabric and Elastic Selection

For the bralette of the Tropo Camisole, you can use any fabric that you use for body, but you also have other options. In this post we’ll talk about the pros and cons of the various fabric options. Before delving into bralette fabric, read the post on selecting fabric for the Tropo Camisole. The choices you make for your bralette fabric will greatly depend on how much support and coverage you want. Fabric Options: The easiest choice for your bralette is to use the same fabric as the body of your camisole. Similar to when you’re choosing the main fabric, you’ll want to consider weight, stretch, and recovery. I’ve made the bralette for many of my Tropo Camisoles with interlock knit and I think it’s a great choice for me because it’s thick enough to offer some nipple coverage and it has recovery (I’ve found most all interlock knits to …

Fabric Choices for the Tropo Camisole

tropo camisole with sexy v straps by Tuesday Stitches

Like any sewing pattern, the Tropo Camisole can be made from a variety of fabrics. We recommend knits with 40% stretch, though you can use a slightly less/more stretchy fabric (though you may want to go up/down a size, more on that below). Jersey is the most obvious choice though you can also use interlock, thermal, ribbing, sport lycra, and others. Below, we share examples of Tropo Camisoles made in different fabrics so we can highlight the good and bad in the subtly different fabrics (and so you can see what they might look like). The things you’ll want to pay attention to: weight, drape, stretch, and recovery. Weight & Drape: This grey Tropo is made from the most lightweight of the fabrics we’ve used. It’s a jersey with some rayon content and 40% stretch. I love this one as a base layer for layering (it was my go-to all …

Alternative Construction Order for the Tropo Camisole

The Tropo Camisole instructions are written so that you can sew them on a basic sewing machine without any extra fancy attachments. But what if you want to use a coverstitch machine and/or a binding attacher? No problem! You just have to change the order of construction a bit and we’ll talk you through how to do that. Why didn’t we include this method in the instructions? It has a number of drawbacks that you should note: this construction order is not compatible with the built-in bralette. This method also uses more fold-over elastic (FOE) than the normal method. You also can’t baste on your straps to make sure they’re the right length before sewing them on so you’ll have to rely on the suggested lengths in the pattern or sew a test camisole (using the same FOE as FOE stretchiness can vary) first. We’re not going to talk through …

Using Different FOE Sizes on the Tropo Camisole

FOE elastic comes in a variety of widths, most typically from 3/8″ to 1″. You can read all about FOE and how to sew it here. I wanted to show how FOE width affects the sewing, styling, and functionality of the Tropo Camisole. The sample Emily is wearing is 3/8″ FOE. Style: Narrow elastic gives the most delicate and “spaghetti strap” effect. If you are petite and want your camisole straps to be proportional or if you are want to minimize the visual impact of your straps then 3/8″ FOE is a good choice. Your stitching (especially a zig-zag stitch) is likely to be the most visible on a narrow elastic as it covers proportionately more of the elastic. Sewing: 3/8″ FOE is the fussiest to apply since you have the smallest amount of wiggle room when aligning the edge of your fabric to the center of the FOE. Function: …

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Tropo Camisole Pattern Testers

The most satisfying and inspiring part of any pattern release is seeing it made up by other people! It is so fun to see a collection of different size and shape bodies using different fabric and making different design decisions, all from the same pattern. I was fortunate to have an amazing, inspiring, creative group that tested the Tropo Camisole. Here are the gorgeous creations of those testers that were happy to have their pictures shared. Ani says “I really love the strappy details! It’s something I’ve been seeing around and they don’t really make things in my size with those details. I didn’t realize what a simple addition they were and now I can add them to anything! (Also, the size-inclusive cup sizes!!!)” Find her on Instagram. *Ani is one of our cover models!* Berangere says “I sure will recommend this pattern to others. It is extremely easy to make …