Sewing the Bralette in the Tropo Camisole

The optional built-in bralette in the Tropo Camisole does make it a bit harder to sew the camisole, but I think it’s totally worth it. Personally, I wear my Tropos all the time and only wear them with bralettes because I don’t need a lot of bust support and I love the fact that I don’t have to worry about bra straps showing under the camisole. If you’d like to sew a bralette into your Tropo Camisole but want a little extra hand-holding, read on! You can sew the bralette out of a variety of fabrics. (See the Tropo Camisole Fabric post and the Tropo Camisole Bralette Fabric post for more info). This example is using a sport lycra. Depending on your bust size and shape, desired level of support, and the fabric you are using, you may wish to change the shape of the bralette. I shaved off about …

How to Sew the Straps on the Tropo Camisole

Sometimes it’s nice to have some extra hand-holding through a tricky sewing step, isn’t it? This blog post will walk you through how to to sew all of the versions of the straps on the Tropo Camisole with an emphasis on the V-strap version since it can be a little intimidating. My favorite version is the V-strap on both front and back since it’s super fun and a little bit sexy and, hopefully, if you were worried about it being too hard, this post will convince you that you can do it!. (And if it’s not you’re thing, that’s cool too. Read along for the other strap configurations too!). If you’re using a bralette, make sure that it’s done and basted to the camisole all along the top – neckline and underarm both. Finish the neckline of both the front and back of the Tropo Camisole with fold-over elastic. (Read all about …

2

Tropo Camisole Bralette Fabric and Elastic Selection

For the bralette of the Tropo Camisole, you can use any fabric that you use for body, but you also have other options. In this post we’ll talk about the pros and cons of the various fabric options. Before delving into bralette fabric, read the post on selecting fabric for the Tropo Camisole. The choices you make for your bralette fabric will greatly depend on how much support and coverage you want. Fabric Options: The easiest choice for your bralette is to use the same fabric as the body of your camisole. Similar to when you’re choosing the main fabric, you’ll want to consider weight, stretch, and recovery. I’ve made the bralette for many of my Tropo Camisoles with interlock knit and I think it’s a great choice for me because it’s thick enough to offer some nipple coverage and it has recovery (I’ve found most all interlock knits to …

Fabric Choices for the Tropo Camisole

tropo camisole with sexy v straps by Tuesday Stitches

Like any sewing pattern, the Tropo Camisole can be made from a variety of fabrics. We recommend knits with 40% stretch, though you can use a slightly less/more stretchy fabric (though you may want to go up/down a size, more on that below). Jersey is the most obvious choice though you can also use interlock, thermal, ribbing, sport lycra, and others. Below, we share examples of Tropo Camisoles made in different fabrics so we can highlight the good and bad in the subtly different fabrics (and so you can see what they might look like). The things you’ll want to pay attention to: weight, drape, stretch, and recovery. Weight & Drape: This grey Tropo is made from the most lightweight of the fabrics we’ve used. It’s a jersey with some rayon content and 40% stretch. I love this one as a base layer for layering (it was my go-to all …

Introducing Maternity Patterns and MaternitySewing.com!

MaternitySewing.com

If you’ve ever noticed things being a little quiet here behind the scenes in the last year, chances are it was because I was working on Maternity Sewing. I’m pretty darn stoked to say that our launch date is finally here and I don’t have to be quiet any more. Hooray! MaternitySewing.com is your source for maternity, nursing, and postpartum friendly sewing patterns. More than just being a curated sewing pattern shop, we want to be a community resource so we have plans for blog content and a podcast featuring maternity/nursing/postpartum sewing tutorials and inspiration and body positivity through all of the changes your body undergoes. We want to be a part of a community of women who have “been there” or are “there” right now to provide you both sewing and emotional support through what’s likely to be the biggest changes your body and your life will undergo. Even …

Alternative Construction Order for the Tropo Camisole

The Tropo Camisole instructions are written so that you can sew them on a basic sewing machine without any extra fancy attachments. But what if you want to use a coverstitch machine and/or a binding attacher? No problem! You just have to change the order of construction a bit and we’ll talk you through how to do that. Why didn’t we include this method in the instructions? It has a number of drawbacks that you should note: this construction order is not compatible with the built-in bralette. This method also uses more fold-over elastic (FOE) than the normal method. You also can’t baste on your straps to make sure they’re the right length before sewing them on so you’ll have to rely on the suggested lengths in the pattern or sew a test camisole (using the same FOE as FOE stretchiness can vary) first. We’re not going to talk through …

Adding Adjustable Straps to Your Tropo Camisole

Though the beauty of making a garment for yourself is that you can make it to fit you exactly, there are certainly still reasons you may want to make a garment adjustable. The Tropo Camisole is designed to have straps of a set length, sewn from fold-over elastic (FOE), but whether you’re sewing for a friend who can’t try on the camisole, know that your body will be changing size (remember that the Tropo Camisole has a nursing option!), don’t want to have to worry about the elastic stretching out over time, or just like the lingerie-inspired look, adjustable straps are a great option! To change your Tropo Camisole straps into lingerie-inspired adjustable straps you will need more fold-over elastic (FOE), 2 rings, and 2 sliders. You want your rings and sliders to be sized so that the FOE fits nicely in them when it is folded in half. In …

8

Camisole Dress Hack from the Tropo Camisole

I hadn’t even thought about hacking the Tropo Camisole into a dress until I got feedback from my Tropo Camisole pattern testers and discovered that Maria had made a couple different dresses while testing the pattern so of course I had to copy her idea because imitation is the highest form of flattery and I thought her idea was great! It’s pretty simple to turn the Tropo Camisole into a dress, but you do need to consider the width of your hips. This will be a fitted dress with negative ease through the hips (to be consistent with the negative ease in the upper part of the camisole) so you should end up with a hip measurement on your finished dress that is a few inches smaller than the width of your body. There can actually be a lot of variability in this number from one person’s “perfect fit” to …

Lowering the Front/Back of the Tropo Camisole

Tropo Camisole by Tuesday Stitches. Camisole sewing pattern.

The Tropo Camisole, as designed, comes up fairly high on the chest/back. It’s really easy to hack the pattern to lower it, whether you’re wanting it to be a little more va-va-voom, don’t want the neckline to peek out from underneath another top, or just want to experiment with style lines. For most garments when you shorten/lengthen them somewhere, you blend the seamline on either side of the adjustment line. We don’t be doing that with the Tropo Camisole because we don’t want to change how it fits in our upper chest. Remember that if you’re sewing a bralette in your camisole you will need to make the same adjustments to the bralette as well. When you’re sewing the fold-over elastic onto your altered neckline you may need to adjust the suggested FOE lengths as you have changed the length of the neckline. For the straight neckline: Measure down the …

Using Different FOE Sizes on the Tropo Camisole

FOE elastic comes in a variety of widths, most typically from 3/8″ to 1″. You can read all about FOE and how to sew it here. I wanted to show how FOE width affects the sewing, styling, and functionality of the Tropo Camisole. The sample Emily is wearing is 3/8″ FOE. Style: Narrow elastic gives the most delicate and “spaghetti strap” effect. If you are petite and want your camisole straps to be proportional or if you are want to minimize the visual impact of your straps then 3/8″ FOE is a good choice. Your stitching (especially a zig-zag stitch) is likely to be the most visible on a narrow elastic as it covers proportionately more of the elastic. Sewing: 3/8″ FOE is the fussiest to apply since you have the smallest amount of wiggle room when aligning the edge of your fabric to the center of the FOE. Function: …

2

Tropo Camisole Hack: Ruche Front

Adding a ruche is such a quick and easy hack to add to the front neckline of the Tropo Camisole (or any fitted knit top, really), but it mixes things up ever so slightly and adds a bit of feminine interest. I think this ruching looks best on the V neck on the front of the camisole, but don’t let my opinion stifle you if you want to try it in another configuration! You can also decide how long you want to make your ruching. I opted for a pretty short ruche on this sample (which actually appears even shorter since I made the straps just a tiny bit too short and so it rides up a tiny bit too high), but you can extend the ruche further down to emphasize (or create the illusion of) cleavage between breasts. To sew a ruche into the neckline, use a piece of …

Tropo Camisole with Stretch Lace Straps

Tropo Camisole by Tuesday Stitches. Camisole sewing pattern.

I think I had even more fun coming up with hacks for the Tropo Camisole that I did for the pattern itself. And this might be my favorite hack! Replacing the fold-over-elastic with stretch lace is easy to do but it really glams up the camisole. (For another alternative to FOE, see our Tropo Camisole with ribbing hack). This example uses stretch lace that is 1″ wide and shows the full width across front and back but uses 1/2 width across the straps. You can use narrower or wider lace but do make sure that it is stretch lace as it will need to be able to stretch with the knit camisole on your body. If desired, start by finishing the neckline on the front and back of your camisole. I opted to serge the top of this fabric for a clean edge as I wanted it to look visually finished, …

2

Tropo Camisole Hack: Knit Ribbing for Straps

We have a ton of really helpful sewalong blog posts planned for the Tropo Camisole. But I’m jumping right in with a pattern hack. Why? Because I’m wearing this finished camisole today so it felt fitting! If you live somewhere where it’s hard to get fold-over elastic (FOE) or if you have very sensitive skin that doesn’t tolerate FOE or if you’re just wanting to further increase what you can do with your Tropo Camisole pattern, this is a great hack for you. To start you’ll need ribbing or even just a length of any lightweight, stretchy knit. I happened to have 1 3/4″  wide strips of baby rib already, but you can cut  strips yourself. It’s up to you how wide you want the strips to be – I suggest reading through all of the tutorial first as it talks you through a few different considerations you’ll need to …

2

Tropo Camisole Pattern Testers

The most satisfying and inspiring part of any pattern release is seeing it made up by other people! It is so fun to see a collection of different size and shape bodies using different fabric and making different design decisions, all from the same pattern. I was fortunate to have an amazing, inspiring, creative group that tested the Tropo Camisole. Here are the gorgeous creations of those testers that were happy to have their pictures shared. Ani says “I really love the strappy details! It’s something I’ve been seeing around and they don’t really make things in my size with those details. I didn’t realize what a simple addition they were and now I can add them to anything! (Also, the size-inclusive cup sizes!!!)” Find her on Instagram. *Ani is one of our cover models!* Berangere says “I sure will recommend this pattern to others. It is extremely easy to make …

2

Introducing the Tropo Camisole!

The Tropo Camisole is named for the troposphere – the bottom layer of the earth’s atmosphere – since the camisole is great on its own but also perfectly suited for layering. This fitted camisole has an optional interior shelf bralette that can be sewn out of fashion fabric, power mesh, or fashion fabric and power mesh together for lightweight bust support. The Tropo Camisole also has pattern pieces and instructions so that all views can be sewn as a nursing camisole. The Tropo Camisole comes in 3 cup size options: A/B, C/D and E/F. C/D and E/F cups are darted to accomodate a larger bust while mainting a sleek shape. View A is straight across the front, View B has a gentle scoop, View C has a sweetheart shape, and View D spices up the sweetheart with a sexy V strap. All views are useable for Front or Back for …