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How to Block Knit Gloves

Gloves, mittens, mitts, fingerless gloves – whatever you’re knitting to put on your hands, it will be even prettier after you have blocked it, most especially if there is any lace or cablework. In my humble opinion, every knitting project is improved by a good blocking (even if I thought it was superfluous for years, I shouldn’t have, trust me on this one). I’ve gotten several questions about how to block my Queen Anne’s Lace Gloves, which is important to do because they have lace and cable stitches! Without further ado, this is how to block knit gloves: I like to steam block everything instead of wet blocking because I think it is easier to control (unless the project is in need of dramatic blocking like my Red Knit Duster). There’s nothing worse than permanently stretching out ribbing while blocking, which is a lot easier to do with wet blocking. …

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Queen Anne’s Lace Free Fingerless Gloves Knitting Pattern

My friend Ann lives in a gorgeous 1800’s farmhouse on an Island outside of Seattle. Nestled in the trees, it’s charming, rustic, a welcoming dwelling. It’s also pretty darn drafty in the winter. To keep her hands warm and dextrous for sewing on cold days, Ann wears fingerless gloves. I designed this pair of gloves to suit her elegant, vintage influenced style, while still providing function. You can download the pattern free on Ravelry. The lace pattern along the top of the glove has a subtle leaf pattern. I knit these gloves in Plymouth Yarns Alpaca Prima yarn because it is light-weight but very warm (and a gorgeous color). The yarn has a slight mohair-like halo which slightly obscures the pattern. In a yarn without halo, the leaf pattern will stand out more. The bottom of the gloves have a subtle peplum, with three lobes of the lace pattern. The …